WWII Military Service News

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Ottie O. Oldham Jr., a son of Mr. and Mrs. 0. 0. Oldham, of Evans, was slightly wounded in action in the North African area on July 12, according to a telegram received by the young man's parents on Monday morning of this week. The telegram from the War Department gave no further details. The young man's mother had received two letters from him since the date of his being wounded, according to the telegram. One of the letters was under date of July 20 and the other July 27. In neither of the letters did he mention about being wounded, He entered the service in January, 1942, and was sent overseas five months later and participated in the African landing last November and in the battles which were fought in North Africa and since the Sicilian landing was on July 10 it is presumed that he was wounded in that section since the date was only two days after the initial landing of American forces on the island. (Friday, August 27, 1943). The War Department notified Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Oldham, of Evans. this week that their son, Pvt. Ottie Oldham Jr., had been released from an army hospital in North Africa. He was wounded in the fighting in the African battle zone, according to a notification received by the parents two weeks ago, (Friday, Sept. 10, 1943).

Wendell N. Jarrett, son of Mr. and Mrs. James D. Jarrett, of Sherman, WV graduated today from the Naval Air Training Center, Corpus Christi, Texas and was commissioned an ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserve. He received preliminary flight instructions at the Hutchinson, Kansas, reserve air base,

Cpl. Lowell S. Salser, son of Mr. and Mrs. 0. S. Salser, of Sandyville, entered the service in Nov 1942, and is stationed at Camp Crowder, Mo., taking special training in telephone communications. He was employed by the C &P Telephone Company before entering the service.

Sam W. Boswell, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Boswell, of Given, and a former well known leader of the Ripley FFA Chapter and a star athlete in high school, is among the troops in the thick of the fighting in Africa and also on the island of Sicily.

The three sons of Mrs. Oda Stewart of Ripley, and Hoyt Stewart of Akron, are serving in the armed forces of the country. They are Pfc. Ray Stewart, at the Army Air Base at Dover, Delaware; Pvt Edmond Stewart, at Camp Wolters, Texas; and Sgt. Dale Stewart, at New Orleans. The grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 0. J. Parsons, of Ripley, and Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Stewart.

Pfc. Fred F. Patterson returned to his home (Toppins Groove) with an honorable discharge from the armed forces Saturday, He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Patterson and was in the service 1 year, 2 months and 11 days,

The two sons of Mr. and Mr. F. I. Smith, of Sandyville, are wearing the uniform of their country, Lieut. Glen Smith is stationed at Seattle, Wa., and Pvt. Dale Smith is at Tomah, Wise.

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Roy F. Parsons, of Meadowdale, are serving their country and are both overseas. S/Sgt. Clair F. Parsons is somewhere in the Pacific area, and Pfc. Delbert A. Parsons is somewhere in the Mediterranean area, (Friday, Aug. 27, 1943).

The home of Mrs. Vallie Paxton, of Ravenswood, is one of those in Jackson County where a four star service flag shows that the war has come to that household and four of the members of the family are somewhere with the fighting forces. The four children are Frances W. Paxton, who joined the Womens Auxiliary Army Corps last April, and is at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, where she is training as an ambulance driver; Corporal Teddy Paxton, who enlisted in February, 1941, and is now in Calif.; Pvt. Earl Paxton, who entered the service in November of last year and is at Camp Blanding, Florida, and Charles E. Paxton, who enlisted in the Navy about two months ago and is at Great Lakes, Illinois. There are few families in the county who have four children in the service, but Mrs. Paxton belongs to that group. (Friday, Sept. 3, 1943),

Dale Good, son of Mr. and Mr. W. L. Good, of Liverpool, Rt. 1, has been in the service since last January and is somewhere in the Atlantic on active patrol duty.

Pvt. Clovia Haynes, son of Elliott Haynes, of Belgrove, has been in the service for several months and is now stationed at Greensboro, N. C.

Pvt. Samuel Lucien Sayre, son of Samuel F. Sayre, of Cottageville, has been in the service since April, 1942, and is now stationed at Ft. Dix, N. J. Pvt. Sayre is a brother of Mrs. Donald Click.

William Wilkinson Jr., a son of W. A. Wilkinson, of Dunbar and a brother of Mrs. Wayne Barnhart, of Sandyville, has been in the service for almost a year and is now stationed in Florida, (Friday, Sept. 3, 1942)

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Pvt. Charles W. Bumgardner, a son of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Bumgardner, of Sissonville, is serving in the Army Air Corps and is now stationed in the Hawaiian Islands.

Pvt. Ralph Laughlin is a military policeman serving somewhere overseas. His wife, Bettie Archer Laughlin, is staying with her mother, Mrs. James Archer, of Ravenswood RFD. Pvt. Laughlin has been in the service more than a year and is a son of D. M. Laughlin, of Ravenswood.

Sgt. Omer E. Thompson, serving in the Army Air Corps at St. Joseph, Mo., recently visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor Thompson, of Rockport, and while at home on leave was married to Miss Avana Moore, also of Rockport.

Emory Dale Balderson, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Watson Balderson, of Sandyville, is serving in the Army and is stationed in Hawaii. He is a graduate of the Gilmore High School and is a technician with the Air Forces in the Hawaiian Islands.

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Carpenter, of Belgrove, are serving their country in the armed forces. Cpl. Brady Carpenter entered the service in Oct. 1941, and is with the Army in Africa, and Pfc. Hayes Carpenter entered last Sept, and is stationed at Ft. McIntosh, Texas, (Friday, Sept. 3, 1943).

w Okey Hatcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Thornton Hatcher, of Kenna, is training at the Great Lakes, Illinois, training station of the Navy. He entered the service in June of this year.

Mrs. Dorton, the former Juanita Hawk, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 0. H. Hawk, has gone to Louisville, Ky., to be with her husband, Sgt. Jack Dorton, who is to begin a 30-day furlough this week after receiving treatment for wounds received in the South Pacific area.

Woodrow Parsons, a son of W. E. Parsons, of Ripley, is serving in the US Navy and has been stationed in the Alaskan theatre of the war for several months.

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. H. N. Rhodes, of Sherman, are wearing the uniform of their country during the present war, Pvt. Shirley Rhodes entered the service in Sept. of last year, and is with the Army in Tennessee, and Pvt. Guy D. Rhodes also entered in Sept. of last year and is stationed at Ft. Eustis, Va.

Gene Kester, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Kester, of Belleville, has joined the Unitetd States Navy and is taking his "boot training" at the Great Lakes, Ill. station.

Robert Snodgrass, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Snodgrass, of Liverpool, is serving in the United States Cavalry and is stationed at present at Ft. Riley, Kansas,

Pvt. Ralph Hermon Ballard, son of Mrs. Dorma Morrison, of Rockcastle, is stationed at Camp Haan, Calif. He has been in the service since last March.

Clifford Eugene Iman, a son of John E. and Ollie (Siders) Iman, of Advent, has been in the service a long time and has been stationed in England for more than a year.

Charles Winter, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Winter, of Cottageville, joined the Coast Guard in April of this year and has now completed his training and is now on active service.

Guy W. Patterson and Arthur W, Patterson, are sons of Mrs. Audelle Patterson, of Ripley. Guy is serving with the Army in New Guinea and Arthur has been serving in the Navy since August, 1942.

Glen Seals and Eldo Seals are sons of Mr. and Mrs. Davis Seals, of Belleville. Glen entered the service last March and is stationed at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., and Eldo entered the service last Nov and is somewhere in the African or Italian theaters of the war, (Friday, Sept. 10, 1943).

A telegram was received by Roy Kuhl, of Ripley, last Saturday which informed him that his brother, Sgt. Jobe Kuhl, had been wounded in action in the fighting in Sicily on August 9. Sgt. Kuhl had been with the United States troops who moved from North Africa into Sicily at the time of the invasion of the island. Kuhl was with the first of the soldiers who landed in Africa last Nov and went through the African campaign unharmed and the conquest of Sicily was almost completed when he was wounded. The wounded man is a half-brother to Creed Carmichael, former state road superintendent in Jackson Co. and is a native of the Liverpool community. (Friday, Sept. 17, 1943).

Herbert D. Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Rhodes, of Millwood, has been promoted to Private First Class in the Army Air Corps, according to a recent announcement,

Olin O. Thompson, son of Oscar Thompson of Sandyville, entered the service last May. He is stationed at Ft. Riley, Kansas, (Friday, Sept. 17, 1943).

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Pfc. W.L. Zahrndt, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. P. Zahrndt of Dunbar, formerly of Millwood, is with the United States troops in North Africa and has seen the invasion of Sicily.

John Okey Cossin Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. John Okey (Mary Shinn) of Cottageville. He was among the first United States troops to land in England in the present war and was also with the first landing expeditions in Africa and Sicily and has been in the thickest of the fighting from the beginning, but according to the latest news from him had come through all battles unhurt. (Friday, Sept, 17, 1943).

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Wetzel Skeen, of Cottageville, was said to top the list of families in Jackson County this week who have members in the armed forces of the country, Six sons from the family have entered the service so far as anyone here was able to ascertain this is a record at the present time. George Henry Skeen entered the army in 1941 and last week was stationed at Ft. Dix, N. J., with indications that he might be on his way to the European battle zone. Camden Skeen has been serving in the ---- since 1942 and has been in the Alaskan zone for some time. Webster Skeen joined the Marines last fall and is now overseas in the Southwest Pacific where General MacArthur is staging a sustained campaign against the Japs. Clifford Skeen entered the army this year and is training at Camp Hood, Texas. Raymond Skeen, another of the brothers, has followed his brother, Webster, into the Marines, and is now training at the San Diego, California base. The sixth member of the group, Denny Millard Skeen, is in the army and is training at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, The only member of the family of children remaining at home at the present time is sixteen year old Margaret Marie, who vows she will join the WAC just as soon as she reaches the prescribed age. Friday, Sept. 17, 1943).

A Jackson County man, Neal Blagg, of Cottageville, was a gunner on one of the bombers which flew more than a thousand miles from the Middle East last month to bomb the Rumanian oil fields and his plane was forced down somewhere during the return flight and he has been interned in a neutral country, but the name of the country has not been disclosed but is presumed to be Turkey since that is about the only country which has not declared war in the region covered by the plane on that flight. This information has been received by the young man's mother, Mrs. J. A. Blagg, of Cottageville, but she has had three letters from the son recently, the last one being dated the latter part of August, but he cannot tell her where he is but because of these letters he is presumed to be alive. The news that he was missing on this bombing mission was contained in a telegram to the mother by the War Department sometime ago in August, but at the request of the Department the news was withheld in the hopes that the young man might be rescued. He has been assigned to the Ninth Bomber Command with headquarters in Cairo, Egypt, for some time and was a tail gunner on a bomber. Mrs. Blagg has received the following letter from Brig. General U. G. Ent, of the Ninth Bomber Command: "Dear Mrs. Blagg, Forgive me for not writing sooner. I want you to know the wonderful contribution Neal has made toward winning the war. I want you to know of his gallantry, devotion to duty and steadfastness of purpose in accomplishing the most difficult mission ever assigned to our air force. Sgt. Blagg is one of the great heroes of this war, and his name has been indelibly written in our country's history. I am the proudest commander in the world, no commander has ever had a braver, more efficient force than the one which bombed the Rumanian Oil Refineries on August 1, 1943. Any information which may be received will be transmitted to you by the War Department or directly from the Group Commnader. I have made a recommendation for an award for Neal's deeds which has been approved by General Zrereeten. You will hear more of this at a future date. Sincerely, U. G. Ent, Brig, Gen. Commander." (Friday, Sept 24, 1943).

Pfc. Floyd Puckett, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Puckett of Ripley, is stationed at Pyote, Texas. His brother, Raymond Puckett, is also serving in the army. (Friday, Sept. 24, 1943).

Pvt. Ralph Eakins, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Eakins of Gay, is serving in the Army and is stationed at North Camp Hood, Texas,

Pvt. Dale White, now stationed at Camp Beale, California, is the son of Mr. Dessie White, of Columbus, Ohio.

Pfc. James A. Casto, son of Mr. and Mrs. Owens Casto of Staats Mills, is serving in the Army Medical Corps. He entered the service April 1942, and is stationed at Camp Bowie, Texas. (Friday, Sept. 24, 1943).

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Dr. N. D. Priddy, of Ravenswood, who enlisted in the Army Medical Corps several months ago with the rank of Captain, has been promoted to the rank of Major, according to an announcement from Washington this week, He operated the Priddy hospital before he enlisted in the service.

Howard Booker is serving in the Navy somewhere in the Pacific, and Walter Booker is serving with the Army Air Corps, They are the grandsons of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, of Silverton, and graduates of the Ravenswood High School,

Pvt. Walter M. Sayre, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Eph Sayre, of Evans, is serving in the Army and is stationed at North Camp Hood, Texas. (Friday. Sept, 24, 1943).

Howard T. Shinn, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shinn, is training at an army base in California,

Herbert Casto, of Fairplain, received a telegram Saturday that his son, Bernard Casto, was in an army hospital in Mississippi and would be a patient there for three months or more. He had been in the African and Sicilian campaigns but the telegram gave no details of his wounds, or what had caused the injury which sent him to the hospital and the family had not learned any further particulars early this week. (Friday, Oct, 1, 1943).

A letter was received Friday by H. H. Brown, of Millwood, from the commanding officer of the ship on which his son, Dean Brown, was serving when he was killed in the Mediterranean sea, on June 22, and the letter gave Mr. Brown the details of what happened, and also told him that the son's body was recovered and was buried in a cemetery on the outskirts of Algiers, in North Africa. Dean Brown had been previously listed as missing in action, and earlier last week the family had received information from the Navy department that it had been established that the young man had been killed in action, but the commanding officer's letter was the first news the family had received on the events surrounding the young man’s death. The young man was a graduate of the Ravenswood High School, made the football team during his first year in school and was a popular student. He was 21 years old last June 15, just one week before his death, and the father said that the birthday present, which he and the boy's mother sent him never reached him and had been returned to them. In a broken voice the father, after reading the letter said: "Dean was no better than any other boy in this war, but he was a good boy, and nobody who hasn't had to go through with this thing can know just what it means to me." As words of sympathy came to the bereaved parents from friends everywhere, Mr. Brown said, "Tell them all I appreciate everything, and will never forget them because I wouldn't give my friends for all the material things in the world." The letter, which the father received from the commanding officer of the ship is as follows: "Sept, 15, 1943: My Dear Mr. Brown, If conditions had been entirely under my control, I would have written you this note immediately, offering my deepest condolences and sympathy, and giving to you the details of what happened on the night of June 22, 1943. The Navy department has just given me permission to contact you and I hope it will help in some small way to know the circumstances. The men on board the LST 387 were close to one another and were a happy and jolly crew. Since our arrival in Africa we had been subject to many enemy attacks and every danger seemed to unify and strengthen the bonds of friendship. We all felt the losses as though they were members of our own families. On June 22 we were proceeding to Bizerte to take part in the Sicilian invasion. We had been designated to carry out a very important role, the completion of which was necessary for a successful operation. The Germans apparently knew this also, for at nine-thirty that night, without warning from our escort, a torpedo struck the 387. The whole after end of the ship was demolished by the terrific force of the explosion. The crew's quarters were badly hit and the majority of the men there were killed. Your soon was off watch and in his quarters at the time, Although I am sure he was killed instantly we were unable to positively identify him so we had to list him as missing. The remainder of the crew did a wonderful job in evacuating the dead, helping the doctor with the wounded and at the same time, keeping the ship afloat. Your son was taken to El Alia cemetery on the outskirts of Algiers and was buried with full military honors. All of the surviving officers and men were there and we had the last minutes of some of the finest men we will ever have the privilege to know. We have just returned to the United States to pick up a new ship and we hope in some way to be able to avenge our shipmates who are no longer with us, but will never be forgotten. Below are the names and addresses of your son's closest friends aboard ship, and I know that they intend to contact you at the first opportunity. I hope some day to call on you personally, but in lieu of that at the present time if there is anything I can do to help, please feel free to write. I was very fond of your son and he was a brave man. Very sincerely yours, C. M. Rocca, Commanding Officer". (Friday, Oct 8, 1943)

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Fred Hawk, of Ripley, enlisted in the Navy more than a year ago, and had been in foreign service for several months.

William W. Shinn, only son of Mrs. Glenva (Casto) Shinn of Ripley, and Keith Simmons, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Sattis Simmons of Ripley, enlisted in Naval Aviation last Dec and began intensive training in April. Shinn is stationed in New York and Simmons is in Tenn.

Miss Virginia Thomas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Thomas, of Evans, has enlisted in the WAVES and will leave for New York (Wednesday) where she will begin her training at Hunter College.

John Thomas, son of Mrs. Taylor Thomas, has enlisted in the Navy as an aviation cadet and is awaiting his call, He is seventeen years old but may be called before he reaches his eighteenth birthday he has been informed. His brother, Eugene, is serving in the Navy, and another brother, Ben, is in the Marines. (Friday, Oct, 8, 1943).

Charles A. Hill Jr., son of Circuit Clerk and Mrs. Charles A. Hill of Evans, underwent an emergency operation at the Kessel hospital here last Thursday night. While on his way to Ripley to get a nine o'clock bus on his way back to the Great Lakes training station, for the Navy after having spent a furlough at home, the young man became seriously ill and the father took him to the hospital for an examination before starting him on the bus. Dr. Kessel, after making an examination, said that it would require an immediate operation to save the young man's life. The commandant at the naval station was called and he placed the young man in Dr. Kessel's care for the operation to be preformed.

Pvt. Carl R. Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Miller of Ripley, and Amos White of Kenna, entered the service last April, and are stationed at Camp Hulen, Texas. (Friday, Oct, 8, 1943).

The War Department has notified Mrs. Rebecca Miller of Kenna that her husband, Private Ralph H. Miller, who is somewhere in the South Pacific, has been wounded in action. No further details were given in the telegram from the department, Pvt. Miller had been in the South Pacific war zone for some time in the area which is under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, (Friday, Oct. 15, 1943)

The War Department has notified Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Wheeler, of Mt. Alto, that their son, Pfc. Clyde L. Wheeler, has been accidently wounded in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska and that he is confined in a base hospital where he is being treated for the wound. The message was received by the parents Saturday morning. Pfc. Wheeler has been serving in the Army since August 1942, and was a graduate of the Cottageville High School, attended the State Teachers College in Fairmont, and the West Virginia University at Morgantown. Few details of the accident were given to the parents in the message and the parents and the many friends of the young man are anxiously awaiting further news this week concerning the accident and the young man's condition at the present time. (Friday, Oct. 15, 1943)

Sgt. Ira Carney, who has been stationed in California for some time, is spending a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Carney, of Staats Mills. He has been in the Army Air Force since his entry into the service in September of last year.

Pfc. Jack Myers, is stationed in the Canal Zone and has been in the service since April 1841. Sgt. Donald Myers is stationed at Williamantie, Conn., and has been in the service since April 1942. They are the only sons of former Sheriff and Mrs. Clarence F. Myers of Ripley.

Charles Rhodes, son of A. W. Rhodes of Letart, WV., is stationed at Fort Knox, Ky.

Pvt. Leon Wells is serving with the Army in North Africa, and his brother, Pvt. Glenn Wells is in the Army Air Force in New Guinea. They both entered the service in the fall of 1942. They are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wells, of Medina. (Friday, Oct. 15, 1943).

Pvt. Boyd Monroe Hamon, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Montague Hamon, of Charleston, is stationed at Camp McCoy. Wisconsin.

Captain John A. Shinn Jr., son of the late J. A. Shinn and Mrs. Shinn of Ripley, is stationed in Atlanta, Ga. His wife is a native of Alabama, They have been married only a few months.

John J. Oldham, son of Mr. and Mrs. O.O. Oldham of Evans, has been in service since October of last year and is now stationed in the Canal Zone area. (Friday, Oct. 22, 1943)

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A Ravenswood man, Gordon Ball, who has been a prisoner of the Japs since the fall of Shanghai, in the early days of the war, is on his way home, having been among the number of prisoners exchanged by the Americans and the Japs recently. He left Shanghai, China, on September 22 on the Japanese ship Teia Maru for Goa in Portuguese India, where the exchange of prisoners will take place. Mr. Ball, a son of the late S. S. Ball, was employee of the Shanghai branch of the National City Bank, and had been in Shanghai for a number of years. He was among the American interned there when the Japs took over the American colony when that city fell and has since been held in internment. While no definite date is set for his arrival home it is expected within the next few weeks and when he arrives he will be the first civilian prisoner who has returned from that sector of the world fighting fronts since the outbreak of the war. (Friday, Oct. 22, 1943)

Lt. Kenneth Nuzum, son of C.L. Nuzum of Leroy, has just been promoted to the rank of Lieut. He is an Army flier with General MacArthur's Army in New Guinea.

Howard L. Gandee, son of Mr. and Mrs. U.L. Gandee of Kenna, enlisted in the Marines as an aviator last April and is now training in Norman, Oklahoma.

Dale Kirkpatrick, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.I. Kirkpatrick, is serving in the Navy on Atlantic convoy duty. His brother, Charles, is also serving in the Navy,

Pvt. John Rex Koontz, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Koontz of Kenna, has returned to Camp Shelby, Miss., after haring spent a furlough at his home.

Pvt. Edward Hartley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hartley of Cottageville, is serving in the U.S. Army, and is stationed at the present time at Shrevesport, Louisiana.

Sgt. Leo Pursley, son of Mrs. Maywood Smith of Sandyville, and the late Obie Jay Pursley, is stationed with the U.S.Army at Fort Lewis, Washington. (Friday, Oct. 22, 1943).

Sgt. Elashie A. Coleman. son of Mr.and Mrs. R.S. Coleman of Kenna, has been serving in the army since April 1942, and is stationed at Enid, Oklahoma.

Pvt. Charles O. Slaven, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Slaven of Sherman, is stationed in Calif. His wife is the former Muriel Wade, of Sherman.

Pfc. James A. Hinzman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hinzman of Sandyville, enlisted in the Medical Corps of the Army in October, 1S42, and has been with the troops in North Africa for several months.

Harold Allen Miller, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Brady Miller of Kenna, is serving in Uncle Sam's Navy, having enlisted last May 25, took his "boot training" at Great Lakes and was later assigned to active duty.

Paul Ross, son of Mrs. E.S. Casto of Ripley, is serving in the United States Navy, having enterd last June. He took his "boot training" at Great Lakes and has now been assigned to active duty.

George Shinn, son of Mr. Clarence Shinn, is serving with the troops in India since early summer,

Lonnie Donald Ramsey, son of Mr. and Mrs. L.R. Ramsey of Sandyville, is another Jackson County boy serving in the Navy, and was assigned to active duty with the fleet some time ago.

Ronald Good, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Good of Kenna, is stationed in Utah at the present time. Refore entering the service he was a member of the Ravenswood High School faculty,

Charles Coffman, of Ripley, was among the first of our -soldiers to land in Africa last fall and since that time has been engaged in the African and Italian campaigns. His wife and child are making their home in Ripley while he is in service. (Friday, Oct. 29, 1943)

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The name of Laban Sayre, of Evans has been added to the Roll of Honored Dead in World War II, according to information received from the War Department officials this week by the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Otho Sayre. The young man, who entered the service some time ago, was with the army in the Italian theatre of war and was fatally wounded in battle. According to information received his comrades in arms carried him back behind the lines and he was later taken aboard a hospital ship to be transferred to a base hospital, but died enroute, and was buried at sea, according to information given his parents. Laban was one of the three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Sayre who are serving in the armed forces. Another brother, Richard, is with the troops overseas and the third brother, Ray, is still in training in the States. The Sayre family lives on Big Spruce and the young man who lost his life was well known throughout the Evans community, and friends said he was one of the best mechanics and carpenters they had in that section. He had been overseas for a long time and had seen considerable action on the fronts before being wounded by the fire from Nazi guns. His is the first death to be reported for the immediate section by the War Department since the invasion of Italy began, (Friday, Nov. 5, 1943)

Warren G. Tallman, son, of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Tallman of Ravenswood, joined the Navy one year ago this month and has been in the Pacific theatre of the war for several months.

Two sons of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Smith, of Leroy, are serving their country in the Army at the present time. Staff Sergeant E. C. Smith, is stationed at Camp Davis, N.C., and Pvt. Foster Smith is at Fort Fierce, Florida.

Cpl. Opie Hammack, who is serving with the Army in North Africa, is the son of Herman Hammack, of Ripley,

Clyde G. Gibbons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Gibbons of Sandyville, is serving in the Army Air Corps. He entered the service more than a year ago and is stationed in Florida,

Pvt. Lewis Mahood, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Mahood of Gay, is serving in the Army and at the present time is stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas.

Alfred Lee Casto, son of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Casto of Given, entered the service several weeks ago and is stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, at the present time. (Friday, Nov. 5, 1943)

The following article was sent by the American Red Cross to Mrs. Paul King, of Ripley, who is the chairman of Public Information for the Jackson County Chapter of the American Red Cross: "Salisbury, England: Private (First Class) Harry R. Wheaton, of Ravenswood, West Virginia, made an unusual debut, he recalled on a visit to the American Red Cross club here, °I was standing on the boat deck," he said. A little push from the joshling gang of Joes behind me and this little PFC landed in my drink. As a European debut this method of approch is not recommended by the highest military authorities." This soldier from the steel mills of his native state, had been nursing a quaint drink, decided to get himself in an air raid. "I had heard so much about them that I thought that the best way to know the answers for myself would be to experience a raid," he declared. His wish was granted one bright and peaceful night in a Northern town while he was sleeping on the fifth floor of a hotel. After the warning had gone, it seemed that the one and only bomb dropped for miles around, landed on the street right outside the soldier's window. "After I leaped about three feet in the air, I made tracks for the ground floor of that hotel," Harry remembered with feeling. "In fact I didn't stop running until the desk clerk caught me to remind me that I had forgotten my pants." Harry's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.M. Wheaton, reside in Ravenswood, to which Harry expects to return in due course, (Friday, Nov. 12, 1943)

S/Sgt. Orville C. Knopp, son of Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Knopp of Ripley, has returned to his base at Maimi, Florida, after a ten-day furlough with his parents and his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Keelbaugh. He has been promoted since to T/Sgt., and has a good conduct medal.

Perry Shinn, son of Mr. and Mrs. James B. Shinn of Fairplain, WV., has been promoted to Private First Class. His wife, Mrs. Alica J. Shinn, is a resident of Ripley.

Charles Nesselroad, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Nesselroad and a grandson, of Mrs. Georgia Jones, of Sandyville and a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Parsons, of Meadowdale, is serving in Uncle Sam's Navy.

Sgt. Rex Parrish, of Camp Siebert, Alabama, Cpl. Randall Parrish, of Fort Lawton, Washington, and Rudolph Parrish. of Frozen Camp, WV., are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. W.N. Parrish, of Liverpool, WV, (Friday, Nov. 12, 7943)

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Cpl. Everett Rhodes recently returned to Camp Polk, Louisiana, after spending a furlough with his wife and two children at Gay. He has been in the service for some time.

Lewis W. Snyder , son of Mrs. Sylvia Snyder of Millwood, entered the service in August of last year and is now stationed in far-off India,

Cpl. Jay W. Brabham, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Brabham of Gay, is serving in the Army and is stationed at Fort Knox, Ky.

Ernest Charles Lawson, of Millwood, has been commissioned as a Lieutenant, junior grade, in the Navy, according to an announcement this week. He attended the U. S. Naval Academy from 1930 to 1935, and held a commission as an Ensign from 1934 to 1938. He reported for duty at Ithaca, N.Y., on October 29.

Sgt. Henry Scarberry, of Mt. Alto, has been serving in the army for some time and is with the forces in the Italian area of the war.

Pvt. Floyd Greene, Jr., a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Parsons of Given, entered the service last May and is training with the Armored Division at Camp Beale, California,

Cpl. James Richards, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Richards of Sherman, has been serving in the army for about a year and is now with the the troops in New Guinea. (Friday, Nov. 12, 1943).

T/Sgt. Robert L. Kessel and Pfc. Roy E. Kessel, twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Kessel are now in front line action, according to letters received by their brother, Albert Kessel, of Foster Chapel. Robert is a radar technician and his only weapon is the "Magic Eye." Roy is in the Medical Corps and is with the Fifth Army in Italy.

George Winter, son of Grover C. Winter of Fairplain, has completed his "boot training" at Great Lakes, Ill, and has been transferred to Calif., where he is awaiting his orders to go to sea,

Robert Carney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carney of Ripley, is serving with the U.S. Army in Iran. (Friday, Nov. 19, 1943).

Mrs. 0. 0. Oldham, of Evans, has been notified that her son, Ottie Oldham, who is with the Army in North Africa-Italian theatre of the war, has been awarded the Purple Heart for the heroic part he played in the battle of Sicily when he was wounded severely while fighting in the front lines. He has now been discharged from the hospital but his wounds were such that he will not see active front line service again but has been given an assignment of limited duty, (Friday, Nov. 26, 1943).

Russell Kay, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Kay of Given, who is a prisoner in a German prison camp, is alive and well according to a letter received by his mother a few days ago. The young man who was captured by the Germans in the Tunisian fighting last spring could not tell his mother much in the letter which had been prepared under German censorship but was anxious that she tell all his friends that he was well and that time was going fast for him. The letter reads as follows: "Dear Folks: Just a line or two. I am well and in good health, and hope that you are the same. I am getting good treatment as could be expected by the Germans. Well, this summer is about gone and I haven't seen such summer this year. Time sure is going fast for me I don't see why but it is. I suppose this time of year everybody at home is pretty busy, aren't they? I am writing this letter on Sunday about five-thirty in the afternoon. I have had my supper and I feel pretty good. Oh yes, some of the boys have gotten letters from home and they were tickled to death, Write to me as often as you can, Tell everyone, hello. Signed, Russell." (Friday, Nov. 26, 1943).

Cpl. Gene Hascue is the son of Mr. and Mr. John Hascue.

Ralph Fisher, son of County Comm. and Mrs. J. C Fisher of Sandyville.

Cecil Moore, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Moore of Silverton, WV.

Wayne Tolley, who has been serving in the Medical Corps of the Army for nearly two years, arrived home Sunday night to spend a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Tolley. (Friday, Nov. 26, 1943).

Dale Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Yancey Thomas of Lockhart, has been slightly wounded at the Italian battle front, according to a telegram received by the parents Wednesday from the War Department, No further information has been received. Mr. and Mr. Thomas have another son, Lionel, who is in the battle zone on foreign soil. (Friday, Dec. 10, 1943)

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Jack D. Kent, son of Lucy Kent of Sandyville, has arrived at the Field Artillery School Replacement Training Center, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Roma C. Hatcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hatcher of Belgrove, and Glenn L. Hardman of Spencer, have arrived at the Field Artillery Replacement Center, Fort Sill, Okla.

William Corbin, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Corbin of Kenna, has been promoted to Boatswain Mate 2/c, in the United States Coast Guard. The Corbins have three sons in the service: William in the Coast Guard, Doyle in the Signal Corps, and Paige in the See Bee's. (Friday, Dec. 3, 1943).

Cpl. Delmar Parrish, who is stationed at Camp White, Oregon, arrived home to spend Thanksgiving with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cad Parrish, of Liverpool, WV, (Friday, Dec. 10, 1943 ),

Three sons of Mrs. Cloah Shamblen, of Ripley, have all gone to war. Ronald, is stationed in Idaho, Parker, was the first to enter and is now stationed in Alaska, and Roy Junior, is stationed in Texas,

Lewis. R, Archer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Archer of Sandyville, is somewhere in North Africa with the Army Engineers. He is the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Archer to serve his country in the armed forces during the war,

Elliott Chancey, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Chancey of Ripley, went through the fighting in North Africa and Sicily and is now a member of that group of well trained veterans who are poised to deal a crushing blow to Hitler's airmies.

Pvt. Howard H. Casto, of Ripley, has been in the Army for more than a year and is stationed in the Canal Zone. His wife is the former, Mildred Durst, of Cottageville.

Pvt. Floyd Ray Kessel, son of John Walter Kessel of Ripley, graduated from the Cottageville High School before entering the service in Dec 1942, now stationed in Alaska.

Clarence O. Staats, son of Mr. and Mrs. 0.J. Staats of Ripley, has been serving in the Army for nearly two years and is now stationed in California.

Pvt. Clifford Jones, who is with the Army Signal Corps, arrived safely in North Africa several weeks ago, and is with the forces now engaging the Germans in that theater of the war. He is the son of Mrs. Ollie Jones and the late Clayton Jones, of Advent.

Pvt. Arthur O. Winter, son of Mrs. H. A. Winter of Fairplain, visited his mother recently before leaving for services overseas. He is with the Army Tank Corps,

Arnold Shinn, Seaman First Class, enlisted in the Navy in October, 1942 and took his "boot training" at Great Lakes. Ha is the third son of Hosea J. and Nancy (Sayre) Shinn, of Cottageville, and is now serving overseas.

Cpl. John G. Harrison, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.A. Harrison, of Charleston and Kenna, has arrived safely somewhere in India. He has been serving since June 1942. He is the grandson of J, S. Koontz, of Kenna, WV. (Friday, Dec. 17, 1943).

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Moore of Silverton, are serving their country. William Cecil Moore, serving in the Navy, and Pvt. Delbert Moore, who has been in the service for some time, with the Army in the Mediterranean theatre an the war,

William Earl Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ova Morris of Gay, is an instructor in mechanics for the Army at Tacoma, Washington,

Cpl.. H. E. Lewis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Holly Lewis, of Buffalo, WV. Company "G" 16 Infantry,

Elbin G. Boggess, son of Mr. and Mrs. Addie Boggess of Sissonville, is serving in the United States Navy, and has been serving for several months.

Harlan Casto Jr., Petty Officer 3rd Class of the U.S. Navy, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Casto of Parkersburg, WV., formerly of Jackson County. (Friday, Dec. 24, 1943)

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Raines, of Evans, are serving their country. Blair is serving with the Army at Camp Clairborn, Louisiana, and Clair is serving in the Navy at Great Lakes, Ill.

Pvt. Russell Jones, son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Jones, of Harmony. WV.

Landon Hersman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hersman of Sandyville, is serving in the U. S. Navy on the battleship West Virginia. He joined the Navy last April.

Pvt. Wilber and Dennis McGraw, who have been serving in the Army at Fresno, Calif., are the sons of Mrs. Mary McGraw, (Friday, Jan. 7, 1944)

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Pvt. Junior Shamblin, who is stationed in Greensville, Pa, is the son of Mrs. Cloah Shamblin.

Carl Powers, who is serving in the U.S. Army, is the son of Rev. and Mrs. T. O. Powers, of Staats Mills, WV.

Charles Long, of the U.S. Navy and stationed at Norfolk, Va, is the son of Mrs. Myrtle Long.

Lawrence Boyce, who is serving in the Army in the Italian theatre of the war, is the son of Mrs. Opal Miihlbach, of Medina,

Terill Shinn, who is stationed at Camp Haan, Calif., is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shinn.

M. Sheldon Rhodes, before going to Pearl Harbor, wrote his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest W. Rhodes, of Ripley,

Charles Carmichael, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Carmichael of Ravenswood, and a brother to Denver Carmichael, of Ripley, is serving in the U.S. Army and is stationed at San Diego, California.

James C. Cunningham, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Cunningham, of Pittsburgh, formerly of Ripley, has been commissioned a second lieutenant and given his wings as an army pilot at Moody Field, Georgia.

Charles E. Wilkinson, son of W. A. Wilkinson, of Dunbar, and a brother of Mrs. Gladys Barnhart, of Sandyville, has been promoted to Boatswain Mate, second class. He is stationed in Maryland.

Pvt. Shockey Milam, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Milam, of Kenna, is one of the soldiers who is serving in the North African theatre of the war.

Raymond Winter, son of Mr. and Mrs. Boyd H. Winter, of Sandyville, is sailing the high seas with the U. S. Navy. He enlisted several months ago and is now in the South Pacific area.

Voyd Casto Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Voyd Casto, of Kenna entered the service last August and is stationed at the Army training center at C:amp Haan, California.

Edgar F. Casto, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Casto, of Ripley, Route 2, is serving in the Army and at the present time is stationed at Camp McCoy, Wisconsin.

Tilden Okey Parsons, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Parsons, of Given, is serving in the U. S, Navy. He is stationed in Oklahoma at the present time.

Sgt. James Campbell, a son of John Campbell, of Sandyville. and a nephew of Mrs. Wade Sallaz, of Ripley, has graduated as an ariel gunner at the Army Air base at Lorado, Texas.

Guy Parsons Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Parsons, of Ripley, has returned to his post of duty with the Army Medical Corps,Fort Devens, Mass„ after having been called home on account of the illness of his mother,

Auville Williams, a son of Mrs. Ella Williams, of Fairplain, is serving in the Navy and is stationed at Great Lakes, Ill.

Charles Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Rhodes, of Letart and formerly of Fairplain, is serving in the Army and is stationed at Fort Knox, Ky,

Pvt. Brady Painter, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Painter, of Given, entered the Army last July and is stationed in California at the present time.

Martin Weekley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley Weekley, of Sandyvillc, is serving in the Navy and enlisted last August. He is stationed at Norfolk, Va.

Warren E. Hawk, joined the Nlavy two years ago and is on active duty in the Atlantic. His brother, Paul D. Hawk, joined the Marines in November 1942 and is at Paris Island, S.C. The brothers were reared by Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Finch, of Sandyville.

Haymon Hamon and Esau Hamon are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hamon. Haymon is serving in the Canal Zone and Esau was discharged recently at Lincoln, Nebraska.

The three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Dosh Sayre, of Evan, and are in the service of their country, and all are Corporals in the Army, Cpl, Garrette Sayre, is at Camp Wolters, Texas, Cpl. Beauford Sayre, is somewhere in North Africa, and Cpl. Riley Sayre, is somewhere in England.

Delmer Click and Elmer Click are the twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Click, of Cottageville. Both are 18 years of age and they entered the service last September and are stationed at Camp Wheeler, Georgia.

Charles Kirkpatrick, son of Mr. and Mrs.C.I. Kirkpatrick. of Frozen Camp, is one of America’s many heros in this war. He was in the Pacific at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, has been rescued from sinking vessels including the Aircraft Carrier Lexington in the Southwest Pacific and is now serving aboard another aircraft carrier in the Pacific and has seen many Jap ships sent to the bottom. (Friday, Jan. 7, 1844)

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Staff Sergeant John R. Pringle is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pringle, of Ravenswood. He has been serving in the Army for more than a year and is one of the many in England waiting the command to plunge at Germany by way of the"western front."

John Folden, son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Folden, of Ravenswood, is serving in the Army Air Corps and is stationed in North Africa.

Major Raymond D. Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Rhodes, of Ripley. (Friday, Jan. 7, 1944).

Kansas City, Jan. 2,: Having honorably served one year of Active Federal Military Service while the United States is at war, Cpl. Delmer R. Hite of the 2nd Ferrying Squadron, 5th Ferrying Group, Ferrying Division, Air Transport Command, who is stationed here at Fairfax Airport, has been awarded the Good Conduct Medal for Exemplary behavior, efficency and fidelity, according to an announcement by Major Harry E. Watson, his commanding officer. Corporal Hite is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Hite, of Staats Mills. He is a graduate of Ripley High School, and was inducted into the Army on Feb, 5, 1942. He is a radio operator with the 2nd Ferrying Squadron. (Friday, Jan. 7, 1940.

John Louis Herdman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Herdman of Evans, has been commended for bravery and skill as the member of the Navy gun crew on a merchant vessel which was repeatedly subjected to "vicious aerial bombardment during a recent voyage through the war zone," Eight separate attacks by enemy planes were made on the vessel, according to the citation. During the fights Herdman's crew brought down three of the enemy bombers and damaged others, according to the citation which was received by the parents. (Friday, Jan. 7, 1944).

Mr. and Mrs. Hollie Kay, of Ravenswood, have been notified that their son, Pvt. Hollie Kay Jr., has arrived safely overseas,

Mrs. Laura Gorrell, of Sandyville, has three sons in the service, They are: Rex Gorrell in North Carolina, Kenneth Gorrell in California, and Lawrence Gorrell at Camp Barkely, Texas, (Friday, Jan. 7, 1944).

John Edgar Rhodes Jr, 23, motor mechanic of the U. S. Navy, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rhodes, 1324 Seventeenth Street, is missing in action, according to a telegram received last night by his wife, Mrs. J. E. Rhodes Jr.. of Huntington. He is a nephew of Mrs. A.M. Smith, of Given, and V.M. Rhodes, of Ripley, RFD 2. The message from the Navy Department gave only a brief account and requested that the family refrain from divulging the name of young Rhode's ship or the area in which he is believed to be missing. The telegram did not state how long he had been missing. The youth enlisted in the Navy on October 17, 1939, shortly after his graduation from Huntington Central High School and was later promoted to motor mechanic on a submarine. He is believed to have been serving in that capacity when last heard from two months ago. He is a member of the Baptist Temple here and the father of a 16 month old son, John Edgar Rhodes, III. The missing man has no brothers or sisters. He is a nephew of Charles R. Rhodes, of Huntington. His father is associated with the R. E. Rhodes Real Estate Company. (Friday, Jan. 14, 1944)

A report was received Tuesday by Mrs. Madge Jones, Hone Service Secretary of the Red Cross in this county, that the condition of Pvt. Junior Parsons has taken a turn for the worse and that he has been removed from the Station Hospital at Fort Knox, Ky., to the Nicholas General Hospital in Louisville, Ky. He was believed to have been out of danger from pneumonia when his grandmother, Mrs. Cora Randolph, of Ripley, left his bedside last week, but has since suffered a relapse. (Friday, Jan. 14, 1944).

The War Department has notified Herman Ledbetter, of Millwood, that his brother, Emmett Cordon Ledbetter, was killed on the island of Tarawa on December 24, when the Marines landed on the island and in one of the bloodiest battles in Marine Corps history wrested those islands of the Gilbert group from the japs after a 76 hour fight. Young Ledbetter had formerly lived with his brother, friends said, and had joined the Marine Corps early in the war and for some time had been with the Second Marines which formed the spearhead of the Tarawa attack. He is the tenth Jackson countian to make the supreme sacrifice during this war. The Ledbetter family came here from Tennessee several years ago and it is understood that the parents are dead and that other members of the family live back in their native state of Tennessee. (Friday, Jan. 14, 1944)

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Cpl. James W. Oldham of the Signal Corp of the Army Air Force has returned to his base at Hammer Field, Fresno, California, after spending a 15 day furlough with relatives at Ripley and Ravenswood. Cpl. Oldham has been in action in the South Pacific. He had previously received a medal for sharp shooting having placed second in his company. He is the son of Mrs. J. S. Oldham, of Ripley, and the late "Joe" Oldham. (Friday, Jan. 14, 1944)

Private Wilmer Lane, of Camp Chaffee, Ark., and Mrs. Lane, of Fort Smith, Ark., returned to camp Thursday of last week after spending a week's furlough with their parents, Mrs. M. G. Lane, of Ripley, and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Anthony, of Sandyville.

Cpl. Keath Bennett, who is stationed at Camp Forrest, Tenn., spent several days in Ripley last week with his wife, the former Billie Burke. Cpl. Bennett was called home due to the death of his grandmother, Mrs. N. F. Kuhl, of Burnsville, WV,

Mr. and Mrs. U.J. Gandee, of Kenna and Charleston, have received a message from their son, Pfc. Howard Lee Gandee, saying that he has arrived safely overseas somewhere in the Southwest Pacific war zone. His brother, Sgt. Harold Gandee, is stationed in Tampa, Florida,

Junior Burton Randolph, grandson of Mrs. Cora Randolph. of Ripley, is improving in the hospital at Fort Knox, Ky, where he has been seriously ill for some time.

Pfc. Lional Leo Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Parsons, of Ripley, has graduated from Gulfport Field, big Army Air Force Technical Training Command school for airplane mechanics specialized in maintenance of cargo and transport type planes.

Mrs. Nellie H,.Alexander, of Ravenswood, has been notified that her son, Charles Alexander, has been classified for Pilot Training in the Army Air Force at Randolph Field, Texas, (Friday, Jan. 14, 1944)

The seriousness of the war struck home to Jackson county this week and in at least three homes there was sorrow for members of the family at the fighting front were either lost or wounded and in another case a young man was seriously injured at a training camp, according to reports, and his mother was speeding south to be at his bedside during his critical hour. Within a few hours after Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mitchell, of Ravenswood, had received news that their son, Robert, was missing in an air raid over Germany, a telegram was received by Mr. and Mrs. Tilden Kiser, of Kentuck, that their son, Oral Kiser had been "slightly wounded" on the Italian battle front where the young man has been fighting for several weeks with General Clark's Fifth Army which has been slowly advancing against strong resistance in the march toward Rome. The message came from the War Department and gave no further details. At about the same time Mr. and Mrs. O.H. Casto, of Rockcastle, who have four sons in the service, received a message that their youngest son, Bernard, in a training camp in Florida had been seriously injured in the crash of a "jeep”. His condition was serious, the parents were told and his body had been crushed and at the time the message was sent a high tempature had developed and a crisis was expected in his case soon. Mrs. Casto left immediatly upon receipt of the message to be with the young son. Just a few hours before news was received by Mrs. Cora Randolph of near Ripley, that her grandson, Junior Parsons, who had been ill from pneumonia at a Fort Knot, Ky. hospital but believed to be well on the road to recovery after being in an oxygen tent for several days, had taken a sudden relapse and had been removed to a General Hospital in Louisville, Mrs. Randolph had been in Fort Knox a few days previous after an army officer had urged her to come to her son's bedside when they informed her of his serious illness. (Friday, Jan. 21, 1944)

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The War Department notified Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Mitchell, of Ravenswood, last Thursday that their son, Robert Mitchell, 19 years old, was missing in action in the European theatre of the war since December 30th. Young Mitchell was serving as a waist gunner on a bomber and had been on several bombing missions over Germany and on December 30 his bomber failed to return and whether he was killed during the flight, or forced to parachute to earth and became a German prisoner only time will reveal. He had been serving in the Army Air corps for more than a year and had been overseas for several months. He is a graduate of the Gilmore High School at Sandyville. The parents live at Ravenswood and the father has been employed by the county board of education. A brother, William, is serving in the Army. He is a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Scott Montgomery, of Ripley. Mitchell enlisted in the Army Air Corps in December 1942 and rapidly rose in his work and at the time he was reported missing was a Staff Sergeant, He went overseas last October and the last letter his parents received from him was dated December 27, just three days before he went on his last mission. A reference to newspaper files on stories of the raids made over Germany on December 30, the day his plane failed to return, said that 22 "of our bombers" failed to return. Members of his family said that they have not given him up for lost, and hope that his plane may have been forced to land in neutral territory, or that he may have parachuted to safety and be a prisoner. (Friday, Jan. 21, 1944)

Sidney A. Kay, son of D. A. Kay, of Cottageville, who is stationed with the Army in England, has been promoted to the rank of Captain.

Seaman Second Class Chester Moore, who is stationed with the U. S "Seebee’s" at Camp Peary, Va., has completed his advanced training and has been spending a 10-day leave with his wife, Mrs. Margaret Beymer Moore, of Sandyville, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. K. L. Moore, of Medina.

R. Glenn Skeen has written Mrs. Morgan Hall, of Portland, that he has been promoted to the rank of Warrent Officer following the completion of a course in officers training at Camp McKall, North Carolina, He is the son of W. D. Skeen. of Kentuck, and is with the Paratroop division of the Army.

Ralph Casto, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Casto, of Belgrove, is with the Army Paratroopers in New Guinea, and has just been cited for fine work on a combat mission against the Japs.

Richard Wilson, who is serving in the Army at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, spent a part of last week with his wife and baby son. The wife, who is the former Freda Wolfe, of Liverpool, accompanied him back to Fort Bragg to visit for a few days.

Harry Edward Finch, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Harrison Finch, Rt. 2, Sandyville, WV. He recently graduated from the Naval Training Signal school at the University if Illinois, Urbana, Ill.

Pfc. Okey Parsons, son of John F. Parsons, of Ripley, has won the right to wear the wings and boots at the United States Army Volunteer Paratroopers World War II's most feared warriors. (Friday, Jan. 21, 1944).

Ensign Horace L. Jackson, of Everete, Ohio, who was killed in a training plane crash on December 18, 1943, at Seattle, Washington, was buried in the National cemetery at that place. It was a military funeral and high tribute was paid to Jackson, who had completed his dive bombing training at San Diego, Calif., recently, and had gone to Washington base to join a squadron. He was a graduate of Boston Township High School and attended the Methodist church at Penninsula. He received his wings at Corpus Christi, Texas, August 25, 1943. He was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Jackson of Everette, Ohio, Besides his parents he is survived by three brothers, William, in the Army Air Corps Reserve, Robert and Franklin, at home, Mrs. Jackson was the former, Freda Duff, of Dunbar, the daughter of Mrs. Cora B. Standley, a former school teacher of Jackson county. Ensign Jackson, who was only 19 years oId, was a nephew of Mrs. Bryan Mays, who together with her husband attended the memorial services for Ensign Jackson at Akron, Ohio on January 3. 1944, which was conducted by Rev. Louis E. Bauman, (Friday, Jan, 21. 1944)

Norfolk, Va., Jan. 16. 1944: Ralph Shamblen, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cortez Vinson Shamblen, of Kenna, Jackson County, WV., is enrolled in the Navy V-12 Unit taking courses at the University of Virginia, Charolottesville, according to personal data received at Fifth Naval District Headquarters here today. He is taking the basic course of the V-12 program. Shamblen is a graduate from high school in 1941 at Ripley, WV also went through radio school, and was ship’s radio operator for seven months, At the time of his enrollment in V-12, he was a lineman for the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company of West Virginia, (Friday, Jan. 21, 1944).

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L. M. Flesher, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Flesher, of Ripley, who has been serving in the Navy for nearly two years, has been transferred and according to letters received by friends this week will now reach him at Squadron 8-C Whiting Field, Milton, Florida. (Friday, Jan, 21, 1944)

The good offices of the American Red Cross are being used in an effort to determine whether Staff Sergeant Robert Mitchell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mitchell of Ravenswood, was killed, or whether he was taken prisoner by the Germans during the raid on the Ruhl Valley on December 30. News accounts of that day as given out by the OWI said that 22 bombers failed to return to their bases in England and it was one of these missing planes that Mitchell, who had gone overseas late last year, was serving that day as a waist gunner. The parents cling too the hopes that he may have landed safely and taken prisoner. They received a letter a few days ago from him which had been written on Dec27, just three days before he went on the mission from which he did not return. (Friday, Jan. 28, 1944).

Friends of the family of Mr. and Mrs. Tilden Kiser, of Kentuck, say that they have received a letter from the War Department confirming the telegram which they received a few days ago telling them that their son, Oral Kiser, had been wounded in the Italian fighting and that he has been taken to a base hospital for treatment of his wounds. The telegram said that he had been "slightly wounded," (Friday, Jan. 28, 1944)

The War Department this week notified relatives that Pfc. Thurman Rondus Winter, grandson of A. Winter, of Gay, was missing in action in the South Pacific was zone. No further details have yet been learned by the relatives. Pfc. Winters who was serving in the United States Marine Corps, had been overseas in the South Pacific theatre of the war for several months, He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Winter, and lived at Gay for a number of years until his family moved to Parkersburg where they have since resided. He has a brother, Rufus Ray Winter, who is serving in the armed forces and like his brother has been overseas for many months, The young man has many relatives in Jackson county, who are anxiously awaiting further news from him, but are fearful that he may prove to be a casualty in one of the many Marine actions in that theatre of the war. (Friday, Jan. 28, 1944).

Edward Rondil Webb returned to Great Lakes, Illinois today (Wednesday) after spending a fifteen day furlough with his mother, Mrs. E.M. Casto, of Fairplain. He is serving in the Navy.

Howard Poling, who is serving in the Army Signal Corps and who has been at Camp Crowder, Mo., for some time, is here on a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Poling.

Clair Smith, son of C.R. Smith, of Dunbar, and a brother of Mrs. Perry Shinn, of Ripley, is a victim of pneumonia according to War Department advices this week, but is recovering satisfactorily at a base hospital in Italy the relatives have been informed.

Raleigh Shinn Rogers, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Rogers, of Ripley, was sworn into the Navy last Saturday and will be called to duty within thirty days. He has been attending school at Blacksburg, Virginia and was eighteen years old last Sunday and swore in just one day before reaching his eighteenth birthday.

Arnold Shinn, who has been serving in the Navy since October 1942, has been promoted from Seaman First Class, to Coxswain. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hosea J. Shinn, of Cottageville.

James R. (Buddy) Chancey, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Chancey, of Ripley, who is serving in the Army Air Corps, has arrived safely in India, the members of the family have been informed.

Staff Sergeant Lloyd G. Moore, now stationed in Italy, sent his mother, Mrs. K. L. Moore, a most appreciated and unusual Christmas gift. It was a cushion cover made by the Arabs in North Africa. The cover is of camel skin trimmed with snake skin and is hand made.

Pfc. Walton R. Wolfe is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. U.S. Wolfe and Mr. A. W. Beattie, of Leon Route, and a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Wolfe of Toledo, Ohio, but formerly of Leon Route, Jackson County, WV. (Friday, Jan, 2 8, 1944)

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First Lieutenant Travis Wells is missing in action following a bombing raid over the South Pacific on January 6, according to a message from the War Department to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira D. Wells, of Richwood, Ohio, formerly of Sandyville. Lieut. Wells entered the Army Air Force more than two years ago and was a bomber pilot and had been overseas in the South Pacific area of the war for several months. He has a brother, Eugene Wells, who is also serving in the Army but is still in the states, According to the message received by the parents, Lieut. Wells was piloting a bomber in a group which made a raid on Jap bases that day and the young man's plane failed to return from the mission and has not since been heard from, The mother of the young flier is the former Miss Anna Archer, of Sandyville, and Sumpter Archer, of Sandyville, is an uncle of the missing man, The young mar. was 23 years old, relatives said. (Friday, Feb. 4, (1944)

A message from the War Department was received by Mr. and Mrs. Holly Kay, of Ravenswood RFD, Friday which told them that their son, Holly Kay Jr., had been wounded in the European theatre of the war. The message contained no further information and early this week the Red Cross was attempting to learn more of the details concerning the young man's injuries. Kay had been in the service for some time and had been overseas for several months and for some time it had been known that he was in the front line zone. The message to the parents was that he had been slightly wounded and promised further information in due time concerning his condition. Observers noted that the number of battle casualties have been increasing sharply recently and that is expected to become even greater as time goes on and the battle tempo is stepped up on all the battle fronts of the world where Jackson county boys are now engaged in combat. (Friday, Feb. 4, 1944)

One of the first Army nurses to splash ashore on the beaches at Salerno, Italy, after the American soldiers had established a beachhead there was Lieut. Ruth M. Sheppard, a sister of Mrs. Clyde Wright. of Ripley. In a picture which appeared in the Herald some time ago which showed the nurses wading ashore in that first landing Miss Sheppard was making her way down the ladder from the ship. Her company left the states several months ago and landed first at Oran, in North Africa and the women of that medical unit were quartered for a time in villas along the Mediterranean while the men of the company were quartered soma thirty miles away at the foot of a mountain range. In that same medical unit a technican was is a Jackson County boy, is serving also, according to Miss Sheppard, He is Roy E. Kessel, a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Kessel, of Foster Chapel. Miss Sheppard knows what it is like at the battle front because she is with an advance unit and cares for the wounded men who are brought back from the battle lines, and before they are sent to a base hospital. Her unit has adopted two children, one being "Frankie," aged 10 who escaped the Germans and was found on the dock half starved. He is now strickly GI in his cut-down uniform and works as hard as any. The girl is "Maria," the onion girl, aged 5, who was picked up on the streets selling onions. She is warm now, and you can't count her ribs anymore, the nurse reports. There are eighteen West Virginia nurses in the company in which Miss Sheppard is serving. (Friday, Feb, 4, 1944).

C.C. Derey has received word from the War Department that his step-son, Emil Nichols, serving in the Marine Corps, has arrived safely overseas in the Pacific area of the war. He has been serving in the Marine Corps for almost a year,

Bill Slaven, who was employed by the Herald before entering the Marine Corps about eighteen months ago, has arrived safely overseas in the Pacific, according to notification received by his father, F. L. Slaven, of Ripley. (Friday, Feb. 4, 1944).

HQS. Panama Canal Dept„ Jan. 28: Private First Class Delbert M. Wiblin, of Gay, has been awarded the Army’s Good Conduct medal for exemplary service as an enlisted man in a jungle infantry unit of Panama Mobile Force, in which he is currently serving. Pfc. Wiblin, entered the Army April 11, 1941, and has been on foreign service in this area since December, 1941. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wiblin, of Gay, Mrs. Eva M. Wiblin, wife of the soldier, lives at Route No. 2, Gay, WV, (Friday, Feb. 4. 1944)

HQS, Panama Canal Dept. Jan 26: Cp1. Eugene A. Knapp has been awarded the Army’s Good Conduct medal for exemplary service as an enlisted man in jungle infantry unit of Panama Mobile Force, in which he is currently serving. Cpl. Knapp entered the army April 11, 1941 and has been on foreign service in this area since late December, 1941. Mrs. Lucille A. Knapp, wife of the soldier, lives at Given, WV. Mr. Emil Howard Knapp, father of the soldier, lives at Ripley. (Friday, Feb 4, 1944)

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Ralph J. Carmichael, new recruit with the U.S. Navy at Great Lakes Training Station, Ill., 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Carmichael, Route 2, Sherman, WV., also, E. Carpenter, 25, son of Melva M. Carpenter, of Belgrove, WV.

Pvt. Paul W. Sheppard has finished his training at Camp Wallace, Texas, has qualified as a anti-aircraft ground gunner and has been sent to Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, for more training. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Sheppard, of Windy, WV.

Dale D. Kirkpatrick, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. I. Kirkpatrick, of Frozen Camp, returned to Brooklyn, New York, Monday after spending a sixteen day furlough with his parents. He has been serving in the Navy for more than a year and has spent much of the time in the Mediterranean and European theatre of the war.

Lieut. Clifford C. Skeen, son of J. D. Skeen, of Kentuck, has arrived safely in the European theatre of the war, according to advice received by relatves. Mr. Skeen already has four sons in the service and two others, Claude Wilson Skeen, of Ripley, and Donald Skeen, of Murraysville, are being called during February.

Wayne McCloud, son of Mr. and Mrs. Esley McCloud, of Mt, Alto, has been given a citation for outstanding performance at anti-submarine warfare in the Atlantic. (Friday, Feb, 11, 1944).

Carl Benson of the U.S. Navy, the son of Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Benson, of Sidneyville. (Friday, Feb. 11, 1944)

Norfolk, VA., Feb, 14: Jack Defel Hunter, 20, ship's cook second class, USNR, son of Mrs. Mary Ann Coleman, of Ravenswood, WV., has been commended by the Chief of Naval Personal "for conspicuous gallantry in attempting to rescue a Navy man from death by drowning." Hunter was born in Ravenswood, Sept 14, 1923, and enlisted in Charleston, WV., on July 29, 1842. He has been advanced in rating four times (Friday, Feb 18, 1944).

Miami Beach, Florida Feb. 12: Pvt. John J. Karr, 607 South Street, Ripley, WV., recently returned from service outside the continental United States, now is being processed through the Army Air Forces Redistribution Station No. 2 in Miami, Florida, where his next reassignment will be recommended. Private Karr, age 31, served as a truck driver in Africa, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and French Morocco. He is the son of Mrs. Ada Karr, of Ripley, where his wife, Madaline (McIntyre) Karr, also resides. (Friday, Feb 18, 1944)

George Winter, son of Mr. G. C: Winter, of Fairplain, is now aboard a destroyer in the South Pacific.

Cpl. Haymon W. Hamon, of Kenna, WV, stationed with an anti-aircraft unit of the Costal Artillery Command in the Caribbean Defense area, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hamon, also of Kenna.

Gene Kester, USNR is now stationed in Washington, D. C. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Kester, of Belleville, and a graduate of Parkersburg High School, class of 1941.

Cpl. Brady Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Okey Anderson, has arrived overseas, according to a message received by the parents. He is in the European theatre of the war.

Lt. Francis Pfost, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Pfost, of Ripley, is serving with the U.S. Army forces in China. (Friday, Feb 12, 1944).

Another name, that of Holly Kay, Jr., of Ravenswood, is added to Jackson County's roll of heroic dead in the present war this week with the announcement of the War Department in the form of a telegram to the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Holly Kay, Sr., that their son was dead in Italy. Three weeks ago the parents who live on the Starkey farm near Ravenswood had received a telegram which told them that the son was "slightly wounded." That was the last message they had until the death message came. They had received a letter from the son on January 16 which he had written ten days previous to that date. Young Kay enlisted on March 23, 1943, and was never granted a furlough before he was sent overseas. He was among the soldiers making an Italian invasion and had been on the fighting front for several months. He was born in Evans on June 12, 1924 and was only 19 years old at the time of his death. The family and friends think that it may be possible that he might have been a patient in the hospital which the Germans bombed in Italy on February 7, but that is only a supposition since the War Department gave no further details. Others think it possible that the ship on which 1000 men were lost in the European zone could have been a hospital ship on which soldiers who had been wounded were being transferred back to base hospitals. Kay had been serving in a hospital corps. (Friday, Feb 25, 1944)

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Luther O. Oshe, one of the three sons of Mrs. Ida Oshe, of Cottageville, who are serving in the United States Army has been award the Purple Heart, according to an official announcement received by the mother this week. The young man was wounded in the fighting in Sicily several months ago but has since recovered and returned to duty with his regiment on the Italian front. Mrs. Oshe, a widow, saw her three sons march off to battle early in the war. Luther has been in the Mediterrenean theatre for a long time. Another son, James Oshe, has been with the troops in England for several months, and a third son, William Taft Oshe, has been with General Mark Clark's army in Italy where his brother was wounded in action. (Friday, Feb 25, 1944).

Lt. Blaine B. Shockey, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Shockey, who for the past year has had active combat duty in the India, Burma, China theatre of war is now located in China. "Sonny" is first pilot of a Mitchell bomber and had been advanced in rank and awarded the Air Medal for victorious achievement while on missions.

Samuel O. Skeen has returned to duty in North Carolina after spending a furlough with relatives at Kentuck. He has been in the service for some time. (Friday, Feb 25, 1944).

Petty Officer Denver Reynolds has returned to duty at Melbourne, Florida after spending several days here with his mother, Mrs. W. H. D. Casto and other relatives.

Enid Army Air Field, Oklahoma: Pfc. Romie D. Counts, 29, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. Counts, of Kentuck, WV, is now eligible to wear chevrons denoting his new rank of Corporal, following his recent promotion at this basic flying field, a unit of the Army Air Forces Training Command.

Joseph Doyle Corbin, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Corbin, of Kenna, who is serving in the Army Signal Corps, has been transferred from New Jersey to New York and may be sent overseas very soon.

James Oliver Kerwood, son of Mrs. J. K. Kerwood, of Ripley, arrived home last Wednesday for a furlough after having spent more than a year in the Pacific war zone. (Friday, Feb 25, 1944).

When her young husband who was serving his country in the United States Army lost his life several months ago his young wife was broken hearted when she learned of the news but within a short time she made a resolution that she would pick up the torch of liberty which her husband had so proudly carried and would in his stead serve Uncle Sam as a member of the fighting forces. She is Elsie Morgan of Cottageville. After her husband, Sgt. Roy Morgan, was killed last year she brought the body home to Cottageville for burial, and after a few weeks she decided in order to in a measure do the things for her country which her husband had hoped to do she must enter the armed forces and she joined the Women's Army Corps and began training at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. Today she is carrying on in a noble manner and by her work she is filling the place of a soldier who is released to fight at the front and she is happy in the thought that sh,e is doing her bit for the defeat of the enemy and able to avenge the loss of the husband she so dearly loved. (Friday, March 3, 1944).

Relatives have been notified that Oshel Otis Fisher, a son of late Otto Fisher, of Given, was killed accidently in the South Pacific on February 12. He was a shipfitter, second class in the Seebees, and entered the service in November 1942. He had been serving overseas since March 1943. Relatives learned of his death on Sunday and the first word they had came from some of the men who were working with him at the time he was killed. He is survived by his step-father, Clinton F. Donnley, a son, Ronald Otis Fisher, and three brothers, Hoy Fisher of Smithers, George Fisher and Lloyd Fisher, both of Sissonville. Loren O. Fisher, of Given, is an uncle of the deceased. (Friday, March 3, 1944).

Lomas Clarence McConnell, of Ravenswood, has been reported as missing in action by the Navy department in an official communication to the members of the young man's family, according to news releases Tuesday. Young McConnell was a son of Lomas C. McConnell Jr., of Ravenswood and Mrs. Ora McConnell, of Huntington, and has been serving in the Navy for some time and held a rating of Carpenter's Mate, first Class. The telegram from the Navy Department did not reveal any further information than that the young man was missing in action, and it was assumed to be following one of the many encounters of the fleet at sea with the enemy. (Friday, March 3, 1940).

Chief Petty Officer Cleo Wandling, arrived back in the United States February 12, after being abroad since last June. He is spending a fifteen day leave with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Wandling, of Given. (Friday, March 3, 1944)

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Chief Petty Officer and Mrs. David Lee James have a son, David Leon James. The grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. W.W. James of Baldwin, and Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Flinn, of Sherman. The father is serving in the Seebees. The mother is the former Margaret Flinn.

Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Casto, Sr. of Charleston, have a one year old son, William Austin. The father is serving in the United States Army.

Pfc. James O., Sayre, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W. Sayre, of Sandyville, WV., has been assigned to the AAF Trading Command Radio School at the Sioux Falls Army Air Field, Sioux Falls, S.D. for training as a radio operator mechanic.

Pfc. Regyal Fisher, and Pvt. Rossie Fisher are sons of Mr. and Mrs. L.0. Fisher, of Given. Pfc. Regyal is in Alaska where he has been for many months, and Pvt. Rossie has dust arrived safely in England.

Pvt. Vernon Fisher and Ralph Fisher are sons of County Commissioner and Mrs. J. C. Fisher, of Sandyville. Vernon was engaged in farming with his father before he entered the service several months ago and Ralph was a teacher in the county schools. The former is training in California and the latter in flew Mexico.

Lieut. Roy Hackney has returned to his post of duty at Salt Lake City, Utah, after having spent several days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. U. E. Hackney, of Sidneyville.

Pvts. Elmer and Delmer Click of Camp Wheeler, Georgia, are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Click, of Cottageville.

Pvt. Ronald Emerick is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Emerick, of Gates Ridge.

Captain John E. Sterne is with the United States Army in England at the present time where the invasion is being planned. He is the brother of Mrs. Imogene Williams, of Ripley. (Friday, March 3, 1944)

The War Department last Friday notified Mr. and Mrs. George Boso, of Murraysville, that their son, Charles Boso had been killed at the fighting front in Italy on February 6. No further details were revealed in the message the parents received. Charles Boso, who was killed on Feb 6, and Miss Mildred Rhodes were married in Ripley last August at the U. B. parsonage with Rev. Harry Miller reading the ceremony. He went overseas soon after he returned to camp. Young Boso was the youngest member of his family and was in his early twenties, friends of the family said. He had been serving in the army for more than a year and had been overseas in the fighting zone for several months. Friends of the family said that the young man was at home and spent a several day furlough last August before going overseas. While at home he married Miss Mildred Rhodes, of Sherman, who with the parents and several brothers and sisters survive. The telegram was delivered to the young man's family by special messanger and was the first news they had concerning the young man for several weeks. The long absence caused them considerable worry, neighbors said, and when the messanger came with the telegram they realized that the news they feared for several weeks had arrived. A gold star is being added to the young man's name on the county honor roll board in Ripley and the realization is becoming clearer each day that we are beginning to pay a heavy price in young man's lives in a war which is now raging over the face of the earth. (Friday, March 10, 1944).

Pfc. Raymond Rollins, has spent 20 months overseas and is the son of Mr. Asa Rollins, of near Leon, WV.

Bert Carpenter A/S, who is stationed at Great Lakes, Ill., and Pfc. Hays Carpenter at Fort McIntosh, Texas, are the sons of S. M. Carpenter, of Gay, Route 2.

Harold L. Miller, petty officer third class, recently spent a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Brady Miller, of Kenna, and returned to duty in Florida, He entered the service in May of last year.

Pvt. Marvin G. Rhodes, son of Earnest W. Rhodes, of Ripley, WV., has recently completed an intensive training course in Radio Adv. R.M. AACS, .at the Technical School, Army Air Forces Technical Training Command, Truax Field, Madison, Wisconsin.

Pfc. Gale L. Sheppard entered the Army April 11, 1941, and has been in the Panama Canal zone since December, 1941, Before going to Panama he was stationed at Camp Shelby, Miss. He has a brother, Brooks E. Sheppard who is serving in the Army somewhere in the Southwest Pacific. Young Sheppard entered the Army, October 31, 1942, and has been in Bora Bora, New Caledonia, Guadacanal. He has now moved to some other tropical South Pacific Island. The brothers are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Sheppard, of Sandyville RFD 4. (Friday, March 10, 1944)

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Pfc. Ottmer Paxton, son of C.C. Paxton, of Kenna, WV.

Norman Slaughter, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Slaughter, of Ripley, entered the Army in Sept 1942 and for the past several months has been stationed in England.

Ward Skeen, a son of Beecher Skeen, of Fletcher and Charleston, entered the United States Navy several months ago and has completed his specialist’s training and is on duty now.

James E. Kibble, seaman second class in the Navy, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. T.B. Kibble, of Sandyville, and is with the fleet in the Pacific area of the war. His wife is the former Emma Spears, of Sandyville.

First Lieutenant Sidney A. Kay, former Jackson County school principal, is the son of Dudley A. Kay, Cottageville, WV., and an alumnus of Salem, Morris-Harvey and Marshall College. Second Lieutenant Frederick T. Blankenship, whose wife now lives at 109 W. Granville Road, Worthington, Ohio, is a former Weirton Steel Co. employee and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Blankenship, 2514 Main Street Wellsburg.

Staff Sergeant Curtis L. Glover, formerly a school bus driver, is the son of Mrs. Delilah Grover, Franklin; Staff Sergeant Arthur L. Hofer, a tailor in civilian life, is the son of August M. Hofer, Morgantown, and Private First Class Roy Trent, a former restaurant proprietor, is a son of Mrs. Viola Trent, Beckley, WV.

Pfc. Shirley Lional McMurray, son of Mr. and Mrs. S. V. McMurray, of Silverton, who joined the Army Air Force at Fort Hayes, September 3, 1943.

William Corbin, BM2/c U.S.C.G,. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Corbin, of Kenna, WV.

Pfc. Elbert C. Wilkinson and Pvt. Orland J. Wilkinson, are son of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Wilkinson, of Sandyville. Elbert has been in the service since April 1942 and is in the Mediterranean theatre of the war and Orland entered last August and is training in Mississippi.

Ronald Murray, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Murray, of Sandyville, has been with the troops overseas for several months and at the present time is stationed in England awaiting invasion orders.

Bernard M. Wolfe, a son of Mrs. Ervie D. Wolfe, of Given, is serving in the United States Army Air Corps as an Aerial Gunner on a flying Fortress. He graduated from Ripley high school last June and entered the service soon after graduation,

Joe Easter, a son of Mrs. Blanche Easter, of Ripley, is serving in the United States Army and began his training last December at Fort Thomas, Kentucky.

Wilson Slaughter, Jr., a son of Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Slaughter, of Belgrove, is serving in the U.S. Navy. He entered the service several months ago. (Friday, March 10, 1944).

A young man who saw the great German battleship Scharnhorst sink beneath the waves last December in the Atlantic off the coast of Norway after it had been tracked down and trapped by units of Allied battleships, has returned to duty after spending a few days with relatives in Ripley. Terrence Ferrell, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ferrell, of Richmondale, Ohio, and a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Ferrell, of Ripley. The young man has been on duty with convoys through the North Atlantic to Russia for some time and has made several trips to Russia through the land of the midnight sun and knows what it means, or what it did mean at the time when German U-boats, planes and battleships like the Scharnhost were waiting along the way. Ferrell was with the ships guarding the merchant vessels on a trip to Russia last winter when the great German battleship was sighted some distance off and units of the allied navy began maneuvering to bring the giant of the sea to battle. After several days the great ship was trapped and the fight opened and because of her size and armor it was no easy job to send her to the bottom but after being subjected to broadsides from the guns of the Allied fleet she finally went out of control and a blast from a British battleship resulted in the great ship sinking beneath the waves and the pride of Hitler's navy was gone. On his trip back to Ripley, young Ferrell was accompanied by his bride of only a few months. He also visited his parents during the time before he had to report back to duty to sail to the war invested regions of the Atlantic again. (Friday, March 17, 1944).

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When Uncle Sam’s Marines wades ashore in the landing on Marshall Islands which were taken so quickly from the Japs, a young man who has set many new stories to type for the readers of this newspaper was with the landing party. He was “Bill” Slaven, who for a long time operated a linotype machine in the Herald’s composing room. As the war went on and more and more young men were being called and it became evident that we were in for a long, hard war, "Bill" Slaven decided that he wouldn't even wait to be called up and one day went over to Charleston and signed up with the Marines and was off to Paris Island a few days later for his "boot training." This completed, he came home for a short furlough and several months ago he wrote to members of the family that he was "heading somewhere" and it looked like it must be the Pacific. Nothing was heard from him for several weeks and naturally there was worry on the part of the parents and many an inquiry around the Herald plant as scores of his friends who had known him in private life would drop in to inquire, "Any news from Bill?" But for days and weeks no news came, but last week the parents did get a letter and they were told by the young man that he had come through it all without a scratch and that he was now with his company which had been sent some distance behind the lines on another Pacific island to a rest camp, and when the news was received everybody relaxed just a little although they realized that a quick unassuming young man had already seen war at first hand, and was now resting up to take another try at it. (Friday, March 17, 1944)

Pfc. Rondos Thurman Winter, a grandson of "Ab" Winter, of Gay, reported missing for some time in the Pacific, was killed in the preformance of his duty at Tarawa Island last Nov 20, a message from the Navy Department informed the mother, Mrs. Ollie C. Winter, of Parkersburg, this week. The latter part of January the mother was informed that the son, who was a 20-year old Marine, was missing in action, and no further word had been received until this week when the message came that it had been established that the young man was killed in action but gave no further details. Before entering the service he was employed at the Mountain State Steel Foundry. He enlisted Nov. 2, 1942 and had served just one year and eighteen days at the time the was killed. Relatives include his mother, two sisters, Ada and Thelma Winter and one brother, Pfc. Rufus Winter, of Gay. An uncle, Norman Winter, of Ripley, entered the Navy only a few weeks ago. (Friday, March 17, 1944)

Arnold Casto is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Casto, of Fairplain. He has been in the Army for some time and is serving in an Armored Replacement unit.

Henry Harrison, apprentice seaman in the U.S. Navy, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Shirley Harrison, of Kenna. He completed his training at Great Lakes some time ago and is now somewhere in the Pacific.

Promotion of Cpl. Raymond Benson to Sergeant has been announced at an 8th Air Force Service Command station in England. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence H. Benson, of Rt. 1, Ripley. His wife is the former Miss Mita Hoover, of Kent, Ohio.

Pvt. Bernard M. Wolfe, the son of Mrs. Erva Wolfe, of Given, WV. He was sworn into the Army on June 28, 1943.

Dallas D, Whiting, 19, sun of Mr. and Mrs. W. Okey Whiting, of Ripley, WV.

John W. Waskey, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Waskey, of Route 2, Sandyville.

Eugene and Harold Carney, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carney, of Ripley, are both in England. Harold, who was with the invading forces in North Africa more than a year ago and fought through Sicily and was later transferred back to England, learned that his brother, Eugene had landed in England and was able with considerable effort to locate him and got a short furlough which the two brothers spent together in an English town. The third of the Carney brothers, Robert, is with the Army in Persia, where he has been stationed for some time.

Cpl. Herbert Hartley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt Hartley, of Cottageville, writes his parents from Australia, where he has been stationed for several months. Cpl. Hartley is serving with the Signal Corps.

Martin U. Weekley, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Harley Weekley, of Sandyville, arrived last week to spend a furlough with his parents. He is serving with the Navy and has seen service in the Atlantic.

Harold Gandee, son of Mr. and Mrs. U. J. Gandee, of Kenna and Charleston, has arrived safely in England.

Harry F. Skeen, who was with the troops that landed on Kiska island west of Alaska last summer, arrived last week to spend a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Skeen, of Fletcher.

D. F Hill, of Kenna, has received a letter from his sun, Colonel Boyd B. Hill, telling of his safe arrival with the United States forces now in China. (Friday, March 17, 1944)

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Terrill Shinn, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shinn, of Evans, entered the service several months ago and is training in California. He is serving in the Anti-Aircraft forces of the Army.

Lawrence Frederick Scarberry, now serving in the Navy, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. David Scarberry, of Mt. Alto, WV. He entered the Navy last October.

Pvt Lincoln Skeen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil L. Skeen, of Kenna, entered the Army several months ago and has spent time training in Virginia and Indiana and other points. He is serving in the Army Air Corps and is somewhere in the Pacific area of the war.

George W. Skeen, a private first class in the United States Army, has been in the service for more than a year. His mother is Mrs. Mary Greene, of Kenna, WV.

The two sons of Mrs. Annie Tolley, of Gay, are both serving in the armed forces at the present time. They are Pvt. Willard Tolley, and Sgt. Howard Tolley.

Arthur Casto, one of the four sons of Mr. and Mrs. 0. H. Casto, of Rockcastle, who are serving in the armed forces has completed his academic courses in the Air Force and is now flying. He has been in Montana for some time. (Friday, March 17, 1944)

The War Department has notified Mr. and Mrs. Ray Click, of Mt. Alto, WV., that their son, Delbert Click, has been seriously wounded on a bombing mission in the Italian theatre of the war and is now in an army hospital where he is being treated. Further details have not been revealed. Young Click had been serving in the Army Air Force and was a bombardier on a heavy bomber and had several missions to his credit until his ill-fated flight during which a German shell struck the bomber on which he was serving and he was seriously wounded but the pilot brought the badly damaged ship to an Allied base where it landed and the wounded crewmen were taken to hospitals. Click had served in the same squadron with Captain Clark Gable, noted film star, who served overseas for several months before being transferred back to the states. He spent several months training at air stations in this country and had been overseas several months. Indications are that if he survives his wounds he will be transferred back to a hospital in this country. The parents and the many friends of the young man are hopeful that the next news will bring encouragement to all who hope for his recovery. (Friday, March 24, 1944)

James 0. Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Morris, of Youngstown, Ohio received some time ago the commission of a second lieutenant in the Army Air Corps. Prior to graduation from the army air base at Big Springs, Texas, he completed and won second place among 24 of the nation’s best bombardiers in the bombing Olympics held in Victorville, Calif., winning him the title of Ace Bombardier. He is now stationed in Italy. Mrs. O.C. Morris is a sister of Mrs. Foster Morris, formerly of Staats Mills, WV.

Lawrence Davis, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Davis, of Liverpool, has been serving in the Navy for more than three years and has participated in several naval engagements during the war.

Oliver Hatcher, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hatcher, of Kenna, is serving in the U. S. Cavalry and is training at Ft. Riley, Kansas.

Sgt. Rollie C. Hill, 20, Flying Fortress radio operator and gunner, son of Mr. O. C. Hill, of Leroy, WV, is promoted to Staff Sergeant, the Commanding General of the Eight Air Force announced recently.

Everett Parrish, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Parrish, of Liverpool, is serving in the Army Air Corps and is stationed in Georgia at the present time. He has already saw several months of overseas service during the war.

Pfc. Robert McIntyre, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. McIntyre, of Cottageville, is serving in the Army and is stationed in Calif. Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre have two other sons, Cpl. John and Cpl. Raymond McIntyre, who are serving in the Army also.

Franklin Staats, son of Attorney Carter W. Staats, has written his father that he has suffered a slight shrapnel wound in the arm and is a patient in an Army hospital in Italy where he has been for several weeks. No further word has been received by the members of the family.

Cpl. B. W. Peck, Jr., a son of Mr. B. W. Peck of Burnsville, is serving with the Army Air Corps in England. He is a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Spinks, of Ripley.

Sgt. Richard Pfost, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Pfost, of Kenna, is serving in the Army Air Corps and is stationed at Amarillo, Texas.

Maxwell McGrady, a son of Mrs. Alice McGrady, of Parkersburg, formerly of Gay, is serving in the Army Air Corps and is stationed in Florida.

James Shamblin, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Doy Shamblin, of Romance, is serving in the Navy and has been on active duty with the fleet for several months. (Friday, March 24, 1944)

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Cecil Kuhn, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mat Kuhn of Staats Mills, died in a naval hospital at Portland, Maine, last Wednesday, and the father who had started upon receipt of a message that the son was seriously ill was halted in his trip at Charleston at the C and O railroad station just before he was to board the George Washington Special for the east in hope that he could reach the bedside of his son before he died. No details of the cause of the death have yet been reported officially to the parents, but they are of the opinion that his death resulted from measles and pneumonia because when he was home a few days ago he told them that he had been exposed to measles. Kuhn had served in the Coast Guard for more than two years and had crossed the Atlantic several times on convoy duty, and when he was home for the furlough a few days ago has said that he was enjoying his experience and that convoying the Atlantic now was quite different from what it was a year ago, or two ago when the waters were infested with German U-boats and the skies with German planes.

The body of Cecil Kuhn, Coast Guardsmen and a son of Mr. and Mrs. Mat Kuhn of Staats Mills, who died in Portland, Maine on Wednesday arrived in Ripley during the early hours of Sunday morning, accompanied by members of the Coast Guard and the funeral services were held at Fairplain on Sunday afternoon with a large crowd in attendance. A large contingent of Coast Guardsmen were on hand for the military funeral. Kuhn's body was the second of the heroes of this war from Jackson County to be returned home thus far for burial. (Friday, March 31, 1844).

Upon completing their recruit training, these men will be home on a nine-day leave. They are: Cecil Lawrence Suck, 34, husband of Mrs. Faye Board Suck, and Wendell Casto Parsons, 17, soon of Mr. and Mrs. Charles O. Parsons.

Walter Horn, of Ripley, has received a letter from his son, Pvt. Melvin Horn, that he has arrived safely in Italy. He entered the Army several months ago.

George L. Shinn, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Shinn, of Mt. Alto, WV., has been promoted from Corporal to Sergeant it has been announced by his commanding officer.

Sgt. Oscar F. Mays, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Mays, of Ripley, WV., was graduated last week from the Army Air Force Flexible Gunnery School, Lorado Army Air Field, Lorada, Texas, a member of the AAF Training Command.

Mr. and Mrs. Orville Stover, of Cottageville have received word that their son, Carl is serving his country somewhere in Italy. He has recently been promoted to T/Sgt. Another son, Pfc. Clyde Stover is serving in England. A third son, Doyl has enlisted in the Navy. He left this week for the Naval Training Base at Great Lakes.

Seaman Roy Fisher, who is serving in the South Pacific, is the son of Mrs. Edgar Fisher, of Liberty, WV. (Friday, March 31, 1944).

Ray Andrick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Andrick, of Sandyville RFD, has been seriously wounded at Bouganville in the Southwest Pacific according to a message received by the parents from the War Department last Thursday morning. No further news concerning the young man’s condition had been received at press time but the fact that the War Department had told the parents the wounds were serious was the cause for much concern. A few days prior to that time the parents had received a letter from him in which he had told them that he had been wounded and that he was very weak. Fears are expressed that since the War Department message was sent several days later that his condition may have grown worse. The young man is one of the three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Andrick who are serving in the armed forces. He has a twin brother, Robert, who is serving with the Navy, and another brother, Glen Andrick, who is serving in the Army. (Friday, April 7, 1944).

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Buddy McConnell, a junior in the Ravenswood High School this week received a message from the Navy Department telling him that his father, Lomas C. McConnell, had been instantly killed in action while on duty with the Navy and hoped that the young man might "find consolation from the knowledge that your father was courageously serving his country at the time of his death." Several weeks ago McConnell had been reported missing and the members of the family were told that when further news of him was learned by the Navy Department that it would be transmitted to them. The message young McConnell received follows: "You were informed by a telegram from the bureau dated Feb. 4, that your father, Lomas Clarence McConnell, carpenter’s mate first class, United States Naval Reserve, had been reported in the status of missing following action. It is with deep regret that you are advised of information received in a further report from your father’s commanding officer, which states that it is now known that your father was instantly killed in action. Your anxiety for all available details surrounding the loss of your father is fully understood by the Navy department, but by the exigencies of war often greatly delay such information. This bureau will again communicate with you as soon as possible to obtain and release the circumstances of the action. The Navy department fully understands the great loss you have suffered. Even though words cannot alleviate your grief, it is hoped you may find consolation from the knowledge that your father was courageously serving his country at the time of his death. Sincere sympathy is extended to you in your sorrow. (Friday, April 7, 1944)

A bulletin received by the Herald last night stated that the War Department had notified the parents of William King that the young man had been missing in action since January 20. According to the report the father is "Todd" King of Eighteen Mile Creek, but no futher information as to the war zone in which the young man had been stationed was mentioned in the dispatch received. Further information was promised in the next few days. (Friday, April 7, 1944)

Pfc. Charles V. Carmichael, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.L. Carmichael, Sr., of Ravenswood, WV.

Pfc. Hubert E. McGrew, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard C. McGrew, of Sandyville, WV.

Mr. and Mrs. D.C. Holley, of Sandyville, have received word that their son, Pvt. Earl T. Holley, has landed somewhere in Italy,. He is with a Bomber Squadron in the Air Force. Their other son, William D. Holley is with the Special Replacement detachment in the Infantry, at Fort McClellan, Alabama.

Vitis Hartley, Jr., is with the Navy as a radio operator for a shore battery somewhere in the Pacific. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Vitus Hartley, of Cottageville and a brother to Mrs. Raymond Casto, of Millwood.

Mrs. Bertha Jones, of Kenna, has been notified that her son, Pvt. Henry Jones, has arrived safely at his destination overseas.

James N. Thabet, of the Ripley 5 and 10 cent Store, has two brothers in the service and both are in a medical corps of the Army. One of them, Fred Thabet, who was employed by the Marietta Manufacturing Company before entering in April 1941, is in the Canal Zone and the other, Ray Thabet, is stationed in England. (Friday, April 7, 1944)

Lt. Francis M. Pfost, a son of Mrs. H. F. Pfost of Ripley, has been seriously injured while on duty with the United States Army forces in the Chinese theatre of operations; as a result of the injuries received is expected to be crippled for life. This news was received by the mother at her Ripley home last Thursday morning. According to the information received, his injury was while on observation duty and it is taken for granted by those that are familiar with his work that his observation duties were carried out by flying over certain sections of the Chinese war zone. Among the injuries of which the mother were told was that he had suffered a broken leg, that his knee was crushed and that he had suffered other less serious injuries, but no information was given or how it happened. Lt. Pfost has been in China for eight months. His twin brother, John Pfost, is serving in the Army Air Corps in England at the present time. (Friday, April 14, 1944)

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The War Department sent a telegram this week to Mrs. Arlie Kessel that her brother, Pfc. William W. King, son of Charles D. King, of Eighteen Mile Creek, was missing in action at the battle front in Italy. The message stated that he had been missing since last January 22 and promised more details at a later date. Pfc. King entered the Army on March 25, 1943 and was sent overseas in October, landing first in North Africa and was later transferred to the battle zone in Italy. At the time he entered the service he had been working at DuPont plant at Belle. The last letter the sister received from him was under date of last December 13 in which he told her that he was well, but that he had been busy since arriving and had little time or opportunity to write. He told her that Italy was a nicer place that he had been expecting before he arrived. The members of his family are still hopeful that it may be established later that he is a prisoner. (Friday, April 14, 1944).

One of the most cheering letters which has come out of this war is one received this week by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Andrick, of Sandyville, from their son, Pfc. Ray Andrick, who was reported several days ago as being seriously wounded in the fighting at Bouganville in the South Pacific. The son in his letter explained why it had been impossible for him to write, how he had thought of his father and mother as he fought at the front and wondered whether he would ever see them again, but assured them that he is coming back alright and someday expects to be back to a peaceful life on the Sandy valley farm. The letter, written on March 26, reads as follows: "March 26, 1944. Dearest Dad and all; Will drop you a few lines to let you know how I am getting along all right. How are you? Fine, I hope. Have you got my Purple Heart yet? I had it sent home, I was thinking of you and Mother all the while I was on the battle front and kept wondering if I would ever see you again. Say Dad, you wouldn't know me now if you saw me for I have lost a lot of weight as you might imagine. How is the stock coming along? Fine, I hope. Did you sell my purebred calf? And if you did, how much did you get for her? Say, are you getting the money I been sending home each month? You never did say if you were or not and what about my War Bonds, are you getting them? Are you going to farm much this season ? And how was the Winter? Has Fred changed his mind about going in the Navy? Tell him to stay out as long as he can for his own sake. How is Pearl coming along with the mules? Fine, I hope. You can see now Dad why I wasn't writing any more than I was, but will try and do better in the future. I would love to hear from you and Mom, often, for it sure cheers me up a lot as it sure is lonesome over here. Well Dad I will have to get some rest for I am pretty nervous as you can see. Your loving son, Ray. Cheer up and Good Luck to all. Tell everyone I said hello." (Friday, April 14, 1944).

S/Sgt. Ralph Full, reported missing in the European theatre of the war last December, is a prisoner in a German prison camp, according to letters received by his mother, Mrs. Clara Full, of Leroy. last week. This was the first news received from him since the War Department listed him among the missing early in December. His letter was written on December 22 and on January 17 were as follows: "Dear Mom: I'm o.k. now, was in the hospital 24 days with a broken leg. This is a transit camp for prisoners of war. Apply at the local Red Cross for details of mail, etc. Will write again when I get my permanent camp. Don't worry, Ralph." A few days later another letter came which was written two days later after his capture. The letter follows. "Dec 2.., 1943; Dearest Mother, You will probably be as much surprised as I to hear of this news, but am hoping you're not too much shocked, as of December 20, I am a prisoner of war. This finds me today in a hospital receiving treatment for a broken ankle. You will be notified by the Red Cross as to my aaddress and being able to correspond with me. Will close for now with wishing you the very best of health and telling everyone "Hi.” Your son, Ralph." (Friday, April 14, 1944)

The War Department Tuesday notified Mr. and Mrs. Yancy Thomas, of Sandyville RFD, that their youngest son, Lester Dale Thomas had been killed in action at the Italian battle front. It was the first news that they had of him in nearly six weeks, friends of the family said. Several months ago Dale had been wounded but recovered from the wounds and went back to the front. His brother, Lional Thomas, is with the Army in Africa. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas had only the two children and both had been overseas for several months. Dale had been in the thick of the fighting in Italy since the invasion last year and had spent many days at the front. The message received by the Thomas family was just one of three which came to relatives in this section on Tuesday, two of them telling that the young man had been killed in action and the third that another was missing in action. According to the message received the young soldier who would have been 21 years old on May 22 was killed Feb 2. (Friday, April 14, 1944).

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Just before the (Jackson) Herald went to press the War Department announced that Second Lieutenant Ralph L Roush of Letart, had been killed in action. He was serving with the Marine Corps. No further informantion had been recieved at press time. (Friday, April 14, 1944)

Norfolk, Va., Herman Ray Bowles, 23, seaman first class, USNR, of Rockcastle, WV, has been sent a letter of commendation by the Chief of Naval Personnel for outstanding service during the fight between a convoy and enemy planes in the Mediterranean. Bowles was a member of the Armed Guard unit aboard the steamship James G. Baine during the action last August 13. Bowles was born August 18, 1920, in Rockcastle, WV, and enlisted October 7, 1942, in Charleston, WV. His brother, Marion Carleton Bowles, is living in Rockcastle, WV.

Mrs. Ralph Laughlin, of Silverton, received word from the War Department, April 1st, stating that her husband had been promoted from Corporal to Technical Sgt. T/Sgt. Laughlin has received his second promotion during a 5-month period, He serves with the M.P. Co. somewhere in New Guinea. Laughlin entered the U.S. Army in July 1942, has been overseas nine months. His wife is a twin daughter of Mrs. Archer and the late James W. Archer, of Ravenswood.

One among the first Jackson county boys to return from extensive duty in the Pacific was Max E. Burnside, Aviation Mechanist Mate, who was given a furlough which he spent with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Okey Burnside, of St. Albans, formerly of Evans. (Friday, April 14, 1944)

Chester H. Moore, S 2/c, has arrived safely in the Hawaiian Islands, according to word received March 25, by his wife, Mrs. Marguerite B. Moore, of Sandyville. S 2/c Moore is serving with the 99th Construction Battalion (Seebees). He has been in the U.S. Navy since October 1943 and took his "boot" training at Camp Peary, Va., and was later transferred to Camp Thomas, Rhode Island, and from there was sent overseas. Before entering the service he was employed at Fox Ginder, Co,, Zilienople, Pa. A brother, Staff/Sgt. Lloyd D. Moore, who is stationed somewhere in Italy has been in the U. S. Army since July 1941. He was formerly stationed at Camp Lee, Va., Camp Shelby, Miss., and Camp Sutton, N. C. After being sent overseas in February, 1943, he has been stationed in North Africa and now in Italy. Before entering the service he was employed at Ames Baldwin Wyoming Co., Parkersburg. Both boys are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Kerman L. Moore, of Ravenswood, Rt. 2, WV. (Friday, April 14, 1944).

Ray Andrick, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Andrick, of Sandyville, has been awarded the Purple Heart. He was wounded in the fighting at Bouganville in the South Pacific,

Pvt. Blake L. Fox, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dencil Fox, of Dunbar, has been awarded the Driver's Medal. He was inducted March 13, 1943. (Friday, April 14, 1944)

The family of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sayre, of Sandyville, is represented in all branches of the armed services at the present time. Their son-in-law, Delmer K. Somerville, is serving in the Marines, James Otis Sayre, and Jesse Wade Sayre, are serving in the Army, and Robert Lee Sayre, is serving in the Navy.

The three sons of Mrs. H.F. Pfost, of Ripley, are serving in the armed forces. Lt. Francis Pfost is in China and has been seriously wounded. Joseph F. Pfost is in the Army Air Force in England, and John Pfost is training with the Army Air Force at Pittsburgh.

Dillon Casto, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orion Casto, of Ripley, is serving in the Navy Construction battalion and is believed to be on his way to points outside the country since his parents have not heard from him in some time, He entered the service several months ago.

News from Parkersburg, WV, last night stated that the body of Sgt. Paul Bostic, formerly of Ravenswood, had been found in the river near the Fifth Street bridge where he and his girl friend were believed to have lost their lives when they were thrown into the river by the impact of their car into one of the girders of the bridge several weeks ago.

Mrs. Ollie Jones. of Advent, WV, received a letter from her son, Pvt. Clifford Jones, who is serving in Italy. (Clifford mentioned his sister, Dessel, in the letter.)

Pfc. William Wilson, Jr., of the Army, stationed in Italy, wrote a letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Wilson, of Pettysville. He also has a brother, Pvt. Gordon Wilson, who is also in Italy. (Friday, April 21, 1944)


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